Micro Minerals of Nevada

The fortnightly Micromount Club Zoom meeting was held yesterday. Bruce Kelley presented the Micro Minerals of Nevada… The video is now available here. All other videos are available here.

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Cornish Anatase…

It can be quite hard to pick out a single dark crystal on a generally all over dark specimen! Here is an example of a dark blue anatase crystal on a specimen that is on a matrix of mostly dark green chlorite. The specimen also contains cassiterite, albite and quartz. Anatase is a titanium oxide and can occur in equant crystals in a range of colours. Ex Bernie and Margaret Day Collection. The label on the base of the box is in Chris Jewson’s handwriting, and was collected around 2001. Width of view 3.5mm. Stack of 65 images. Steve Sorrell collection and photo.

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RIP Rick Turner

Some very sad news. Rick Turner passed away after a short illness this month. Rick has the mineral rickturnerite named after him. Rick recently gave a Zoom presentation to the Micromount Club. This on one of his favourite locations – Tolbachik. It was an excellent talk and you can watch the video here. Rick will be missed.

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Missing Newsletters Added…

Some of the missing newsletters have now been added. These are numbers 95, 101, 102, 103 and 104. You can find them in the Newsletter Archive. If anyone has a copy and the time and energy to scan the remaining missing ones and send them to me, that would be most appreciated. We are looking for numbers 72, 73, 74, 75, 79, 80, 81, 82 and 83.

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National Micromount Reference Collection Selected Specimen #104

Number 104 in the National Micromount Reference Collection is a rosasite specimen from Roughton Gill, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria. The specimen was donated by T. Wolloxall. Notes in the catalogue state “If this is rosasite, it is unusually green. However since there are also colourless crystals of hemimorphite, this is probably correct. Cooper and Stanley, Minerals of the English Lake District,p.124.”

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Linarite from the UK

A personal account by Steve Rust. Included in Newsletter 76. All photos are by Steve Rust. Featured image: Linarite from the Eaglebrook mine, Wales. Many collectors have fine micro examples of linarite in their collections, from a number of UK and world locations. It is easy to understand why. Who would not like to have in their collection a fine azure blue bladed radial micro-crystal group of linarite, contrasted against a background of white quartz. The known history of linarite has been traced back to at least the early 19th century. It would appear that James Sowerby was the first to publish a picture of linarite in his book of 1809, although he called it ‘Crystallized Blue Carbonate of Copper’. It would appear that the sulphate content of linarite was not recognized. It was not until 1839 that the species was given the name linarite by Professor Ernst Friedrich Glocker, from it’s type location at Linares, Jaen province, Andalusia, Spain. Linarite PbCu2+ (SO4)(OH)2 is usually found as thin bladed monoclinic crystals with little development of the prism faces; thick chunky crystals are also to be found. Colour is from light to deep azure blue. It usually occurs in lead and copper deposits, while this is true it is a very general statement. Linarite can also be found in many other ore deposits, which might have only small amounts of primary lead and copper minerals, from which linarite can form. In the United Kingdom some of the best macro examples of […]

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